Technology-enhanced Self-directed Language Learning Behaviors of EFL Student Teachers

 

English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education not only requires students to receive in-class instruction but also necessitates them to engage in extra practices outside the classroom by using technological or non-technological resources. Hence, this study aimed to investigate the self-directed language learning behaviors of the EFL student teachers and their use of technology in the process by employing a mixed-methods study within an explanatory sequential research design. The quantitative data were collected from 110 EFL student teachers by using two distinct research instruments, whereas the qualitative data were collected through an open-ended questionnaire form, responded by 47 of these students. The results of the study indicated that technology utilization is a significant predictor of self-directed language learning. However, the findings show that the off-campus self-directed language learning abilities of the students, with or without the use of technology, do not significantly differ according to gender, age, and grade levels. The differences were only found in terms of unaided off-campus learning abilities of the students and their technology utilization frequency in language learning. The qualitative findings also show that students engage in a variety of self-directed language learning activities outside the classroom mostly by using technology.